Blanche Essay

+ All A Streetcar Named Desire Blanche Dubois Essays:

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  • Illusion and Mendacity
  • Poem Analysis: 'The Broken Tower' by Hart Crane
  • Ida B. Wells, Booker T, Washington, and W.E.B Dubois
  • Illusions and Fantasy in Tennessee Williams' A Streetcar Named Desire
  • Gender Roles in The Yellow Wallpaper and A Streetcar Named Desire
  • The Achievement of Desire, by Richard Rodriguez and Learning to Read, by Malcolm X
  • Using Named Examples, Assess the Effectiveness of Technological Leapfrogging in Contributing to the Development Process
  • The Influence of Brand Name and Desire Attributes of Nokia Cellphones in Consumers Buying Decision
  • The Twelve Tribes of Hattie by Ayana Mathis
  • Wings of Desire and Antigone: Conflicts and Opposites
  • Tennessee Williams
  • Sympathy for Stanley in A Streetcar Named Desire
  • The Marquis De Sades Attitude Towards Women
  • Criticisms of Jane Eyre
  • The Character of Yolanda Garcia in How the Garcia Girls Lost Their Accents and !Yo!
  • Power, Control and Empowerment in Frances Burney's ”A Mastectomy”
  • Dubois v. Washington Debates
  • Role of Masculinity in Shiloh and A Streetcar Named Desire
  • Jane Eyre
  • Jealousy and Desire in Ovid's Metamorphoses
  • Margaret Sanger’s Planned Parenthood
  • Spanish Cinema After the Dictatorship in 1975
  • There Is a Fine Line Between Reality and Illusion
  • My Desire To Attend College
  • Misguided Feminist Reaction to A Streetcar Named Desire
  • Paul 's Unhealthy Desire in Paul's Case
  • A Streetcar Named Desire, by Tennessee Williams
  • The Brown v. Board of Education Court Case
  • Harlem Renaissance
  • Brand Community
  • My Desire for Writing
  • The Poetry of Langston Hughes During the Harlem Renaissance
  • Black Nationalism
  • Comparing W.E.B. DuBois and Booker T. Washington
  • History of Working Women
  • Bravery Never Goes Out of Fashion in named William MakepeaceThackeray's Rikki Tikki Tavi”
  • Consumer Behaviour Towards Watches
  • Summary & Critique About Article the Science of Desire
  • Reactions to Patriarchal Oppression by Jane Eyre and Bertha Mason
  • Is The Second Sex Beauvoir's Application of Sartrean Existentialism?
  • Gucci Brand Management
  • Love and Desire in "Twelfth Night"
  • Character Analysis of Emma in Flaubert's 'Madame Bovary'
  • Using Named Examples Assess The Potential For Water Supply To Become A Source Of Conflict
  • Analysis of Black Reconstruction
  • Revenge Essay When I was younger I had the desire to win, I couldn’t stand losing; it was the worst feeling a young
  • Booker T. Washington vs. W.E.B. Dubois
  • Metaphors from Slavery to Post Emancipation: An Exploration of 'The Loophole of Retreat' and 'The Veil'
  • Stanley Kowalski in "A Streetcar Named Desire" by Tennessee Williams
  • A Streetcar Named Desire by Tennesee Williams
  • Major Themes of A Streetcar Named Desire
  • A Streetcar Named Desire, by Tennessee Williams
  • Blanche is Responsible for her own Fate in a Street Car Named Desire
  • Charlotte Bronte Critiques Victorian Culture in Jane Eyre
  • Not a Perfect Marriage in A Streetcar Named Desire, by Tennessee Williams
  • Vaulting Ambition in Shakespeare's Macbeth
  • Wilhelm Conrad Roentgen
  • My Desire to be an Early Childhood Special Education Teacher
  • The Achievement of Desire, by Richard Rodriguez
  • Passion and Practicality of Jane Eyre
  • Comparing the Life of Tennessee Williams and Glass Menagerie
  • Is the Black Family Only A Myth?
  • Booker T. Washington's Immense Achievements
  • Pepe le Moko
  • Sojourner Truth: A Voice for the Oppressed
  • To What Extent Does Williams Present Desire as a Tragic Flaw in Scene Six of ‘a Streetcar Named Desire’
  • Comparison of a Street Car Named Desire and the Piano Lesson
  • Ethics and Social Responsibility
  • A Comparison of Gender-Roles in A Doll's House and A Streetcar named Desire
  • Identity in Zora Neale Hurston’s How It Feels to Be Colored Me
  • The Influence of Booker T. Washington and W.E.B. DuBois on the Writings from the Harlem Renaissance

Model Essay 1

“A Streetcar named Desire” is a play written by Tennessee Williams in which the central character is flawed but nevertheless gains your admiration. It is a play about Blanche DunBois who comes to New Orleans to live off her sister’s charity after losing the family home through her promiscuous past. Williams makes awareness of the flaw and creates admiration of the character through his use of characterisation, contrast, conflict, key scenes and aspects of staging.

 

Firstly, the characterisation of Blanche DuBois successfully hints at her flaw early in the play. She is described in the stage directions as she enters the play: “daintily dressed in a white suit” and as fragile as “a moth”. Word choice of “daintily” suggests Blanche’s fragility and “white suit” suggests her purity and innocence. Blanche’s purity is furthermore emphasised through her name “Blanche” which is French for “white”. The audience’s admiration for her character begins to grow as she is portrayed as an innocent character. Her flaw is hinted through William’s use of the metaphor of “the moth” which reminds of the saying: “as a moth to a flame” suggesting that she is drawn to danger foreshadowing the idea that Blanche may lead herself to her own destruction. This leads the audience to wonder that if she is so innocent and pure then what is that that would lead her to cause her own destruction?

 

A further dramatic technique Tennessee Williams uses to bring out Blanche’s flaw and our admiration is contrast of characterisation. Blanche DuBois and Stanley Kowlaski (her sister’s husband) have many aspects of their characters which are contrasted to emphasise their differences, create tension and effectively lead to conflict between the characters. Stanley is described as being common: “I was common”. This shows he is of the lower, working classes whereas Blanche is her “white suit” suggests she is of a higher, middle class. Stanley is described as a very masculine character: “Heartiness with men, his appreciation of rough humour” and “gaudy seedbearer”. The word choice of “rough” has connotations of violence which effectively contrasts with Blanche’s fragility alongside Stanley’s strength: “strongly, compactly, built”. His violent nature is also effectively brought out throughout the play through Williams’ use of a violent register in his stage directions: “smacked”, “smashed”, “slammed”. This emphasises Stanley’s violence and therefore creates sympathy for Blanche as she obviously is weaker than Stanley. The expression “gaudy seed bearer” successfully successfully portrays Stanley’s sexual power over women. This also, by contrast, suggests Blanche’s sexual weakness.

 

Williams creates these contrasts in the characters to lead to conflict. Blanche’s character therefore successfully gains admiration as although she has many weaknesses as opposed to Stanley’s strength she stands up to Stanley. Sympathy for Blanche is also achieved when Stanley verbally bullies Blanche and tries to threaten her with what he knows about her promiscuous past:

 

“this somebody named Shaw is under the impression that he met you in Laurel, but I figure he must have got you mixed up with some other party, because the other party he met at a hotel called ‘The Flamingo’.”

 

This successfully brings out Blanche’s flaw: she lies and finds it hard to face reality, she tries to hide the truth of her past.

 

Blanche’s flaw is further brought out through Williams’ use of symbolism. He symbolises her flaw through two symbols: “the light bulb” and “the adorable coloured paper lantern”. The “light bulb” symbolises reality and the truths she can not face and the “paper lantern” symbolises Blanche’s frequent covering up of reality.

 

Furthermore, Tennessee Williams successfully uses aspects of staging to add to our admiration of Blanche and our understanding of her flaws. His use of dramatic irony creates sympathy for Blanche as “The Varasouvania” plays frequently in her mind causing her emotional pain. The music reminds her of the night when her young handsome husband committed suicide. This dramatic irony is reached as the other characters do not hear it but Blanche and the audience do. Blanche therefore gains admiration as she has to cope with (and has been coping with) this painful event from her past which has filled her with grief.

 

Lastly, Williams uses key scenes to effectively expand the audience’s admiration for Blanche. A character who get close to Blanche is Mitch (another strong masculine character). He “tears away the paper lantern” in a scene where he attempts to relieve his sexual frustrations on Blanche. The word choice of “tears” successfully brings out Mitch’s forceful character and therefore the scene creates admiration for Blanche as she stands up to this forceful character and manages to stop him when he tries to rape her. The scene also relates back to her flaw of not facing up to reality through William’s use of symbolism of the lamp.

 

The last scene in the play is very effective in creating admiration for Blanche as she is sent away to a “State Institution”. We admire her character as she tells the truth about an event in which she was raped by Stanley but her sister does not believe her and sends her away. We know she is telling the truth so we admire her for trying to stand up for her argument and for once she has overcome her flaw and is facing reality. She says: “I have always depended on the kindness of strangers” thus creating sympathy for Blanche as it shows she could not count on her close family to be kind and shows what she has had to do all her life in order to survive. This creates admiration for Blanche.

 

In conclusion, “A streetcar named Desire” by Tennessee Williams is a play in which a central character is flawed but nevertheless gains your admiration. Williams firstly effectively shows this through his use of characterisation creating a contrast which leads to conflict thus bringing out sympathy and admiration. This conflict also draws the audience’s attention to Blanche’s flawed character. Secondly, Williams’ use of aspects of staging also draws out admiration for Blanche from the audience. Finally, Williams’ use of key scenes further relates to Blanche’s flaw and successfully extends the audience’s admiration for her character.

 

Model Essay 2

A Streetcar named Desire

 

“A Streetcar named Desire” is a play written by Tennessee Williams in which the central characters obsessive behaviour helps the reader understand the character in the play as a whole.  It is a play about Blanche DuBois who comes to New Orleans to live off her sister’s charity after losing the family home through her promiscuous past. Williams makes awareness of the flaw and creates admiration of the character through his use of characterisation, contrast, conflict, key scenes.

 

Firstly, the characterisation of Blanche DuBois successfully illustrates her fanatical flaw early in the play. She is described in the stage directions as she enters the play: “daintily dressed in a white suit” and as fragile as “a moth”. Word choice of “daintily” suggests Blanche’s frailty and “white suit” suggests her purity and innocence. Blanche’s purity is furthermore emphasised through her name “Blanche” which is French for “white”. The audience’s understanding for her character begins to grow as she is portrayed as an innocent character. Her flaw is hinted through William’s use of the metaphor of “the moth” which reminds of the saying: “as a moth to a flame”signifying that she is drawn to danger foreshadowing the idea that Blanche may lead herself to her own obliteration.

 

A further dramatic technique Tennessee Williams uses to bring out Blanche’s flaw and further our understanding is contrast of characterisation. Blanche DuBois and Stanley Kowlaski (her sister’s husband) have many aspects of their characters which are contrasted to stress their differences, create tension and effectively lead to conflict between the characters. Stanley is described as being common: “I was common”. This shows he is of the lower, working classes whereas Blanche is her “white suit” suggests she is of a higher, middle class. Stanley is described as a very masculine character: “Heartiness with men, his appreciation of rough humour” and “gaudy seed bearer”. The word choice of “rough” has connotations of aggression which effectively contrasts with Blanche’s fragility alongside Stanley’s strength: “strongly, compactly, built”. His violent nature is also effectively brought out throughout the play through Williams’ use of a violent register in his stage directions: “smacked”, “smashed”, “slammed”. This emphasises Stanley’s violence and therefore creates sympathy for Blanche as she obviously is weaker than Stanley. The expression “gaudy seed bearer” successfully portrays Stanley’s sexual power over women. This also, by contrast, suggests Blanche’s sexual weakness.

 

Williams creates these contrasts in the characters to lead to conflict. Blanche’s character therefore effectively gains admiration as although she has many weaknesses as opposed to Stanley’s strength she stands up to Stanley. Sympathy for Blanche is also achieved when Stanley verbally bullies Blanche and tries to threaten her with what he knows about her promiscuous past:  “this somebody named Shaw is under the impression that he met you in Laurel, but I figure he must have got you mixed up with some other party, because the other party he met at a hotel called ‘The Flamingo’.”

 

This successfully brings out Blanche’s flaw: she lies and finds it hard to face reality, she tries to hide the truth of her past.

 

Blanche’s flaw is further brought out through Williams’ use of symbolism. He symbolises her flaw through two symbols: “the light bulb” and “the adorable coloured paper lantern”. The “light bulb” symbolises reality and the truths she can not face and the “paper lantern”symbolises Blanche’s frequent covering up of reality.

 

Furthermore, Tennessee Williams successfully uses aspects of staging to add to our admiration of Blanche and our understanding of her flaws. His use of dramatic irony creates sympathy for Blanche as “The Varasouvania”plays frequently in her mind causing her emotional pain. The music reminds her of the night when her young handsome husband committed suicide. This dramatic irony is reached as the other characters do not hear it but Blanche and the audience do. Blanche therefore gains admiration as she has to cope with (and has been coping with) this painful event from her past which has filled her with grief.

 

Lastly, Williams uses key scenes to effectively expand the audience’s admiration for Blanche. A character who get close to Blanche is Mitch (another strong masculine character). He “tears away the paper lantern” in a scene where he attempts to relieve his sexual frustrations on Blanche. The word choice of “tears”successfully brings out Mitch’s forceful character and therefore the scene creates admiration for Blanche as she stands up to this forceful character and manages to stop him when he tries to rape her. The scene also relates back to her flaw of not facing up to reality through William’s use of symbolism of the lamp.

 

The last scene in the play is very effective in creating admiration for Blanche as she is sent away to a “State Institution”. We admire her character as she tells the truth about an event in which she was raped by Stanley but her sister does not believe her and sends her away. We know she is telling the truth so we admire her for trying to stand up for her argument and for once she has overcome her flaw and is facing reality. She says: “I have always depended on the kindness of strangers”thus creating sympathy for Blanche as it shows she could not count on her close family to be kind and shows what she has had to do all her life in order to survive. This creates admiration for Blanche.

 

In conclusion, “A streetcar named Desire” by TennesseeWilliams is a play in which a central characters obsessive behaviour shows the reader who they really are underneath. Williams firstly effectively shows this through his use of characterisation creating a contrast which leads to conflict thus bringing out sympathy and admiration. This conflict also draws the audience’s attention to Blanche’s flawed character. Secondly, Williams’ use of aspects of staging also draws out admiration for Blanche from the audience. Finally, Williams’ use of key scenes further relates to Blanche’s flaw and successfully extends the audience’s admiration for her character.


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